Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook No. (LDPM-13502) 25 pp

October 2005

Factors Affecting U.S. Beef Consumption

Beef is a highly consumed meat in the United States, averaging 67 pounds per person per year. Findings based on the 1994-96 and 1998 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII) indicate that most beef was eaten at home. Annual beef consumption per person was highest in the Midwest (73 pounds), followed by the South and West (65 pounds each), and the Northeast (63 pounds). Rural consumers ate more beef (75 pounds) than did urban and suburban consumers (66 and 63 pounds). Beef consumption also varies by race and ethnicity. Blacks ate 77 pounds of beef per person per year, followed by 69 pounds by Hispanics, 65 pounds by Whites, and 62 pounds by other races. Low-income consumers tend to eat more beef than consumers in other income households.

Keywords: Beef, consumption, fresh beef, processed beef, per capita use, ethnicity, region, gender, age, income

In this publication...

Latest Release:

Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: January 2018

All Releases:

Select a decade or year to expand/collapse. Click on the link to view the report.