How producers and consumers respond to nutrition information: the case of whole grains

How producers and consumers respond to nutrition information: the case of whole grains

Manufacturers were quick to respond to the recommendation in the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans that at least half of a person's daily grain intake come from whole grains. The average number of new whole-grain products jumped from 4 per month in 2001 to 16 in 2006. For whole-grain products, these reformulations have translated into increased sales of healthier foods. Based on Nielsen Homescan data, whole grain products accounted for 11.1 percent of all pounds of packaged grain products purchased in grocery stores (excluding flours, mixes, and frozen or ready-to-cook products) in 2001. By 2006, whole grains' share of total grain product purchases was 17.9 percent. By 2007, whole grain cereals accounted for 46 percent of all cereals purchased, while whole grain breads accounted for 20 percent of all bread purchased. This chart was originally published in the March 2011 issue of Amber Waves magazine.


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