Brian Williams

Agricultural Economist
Brian.Williams2@usda.gov

Briefly

Brian Williams is a research economist with the Agricultural Policy and Modeling Branch of the Market and Trade Economics Division at the Economic Research Service (ERS).

Background

Brian joined ERS in 2020. His research focuses on U.S. agricultural policy, risk in agriculture, and production economics. Prior to coming to ERS, he served as an economist at the Nebraska Public Power District, where his research aided economic development efforts. Brian also served as an assistant professor at Mississippi State University, where his research and extension efforts focused on agricultural risk management, commodity marketing, and production economics. Brian’s teaching efforts included undergraduate and graduate-level farm management.

Education

Brian received his Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Oklahoma State University, and M.S. and B.S. degrees in Agricultural Economics from the University of Nebraska.

Professional Affiliations

Brian is a member of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

Selected Publications

Marshall, Tori, Kalyn Coatney, Jane Parish, Randy Little, Josh Maples, and Brian Williams “Factors Impacting Reproductive Success and Asset Value of Beef Breeding Females in Mississippi Auctions” Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics. 2021.

Coble, Keith and Brian Williams. “Are Large Farms Less Risky to Insure than Small Farms?” Choices 33(4):1-5. 2018.

Parish, Jane, Brian Williams, TF Best, CO Stewart. “A Hedonic Analysis of Sale lot Traits Affecting Calf Prices in Mississippi Auction Markets.” The Professional Animal Scientist 34(3):240-249. 2018.

Williams, Brian, Eric DeVuyst, Darrell Peel, and Kellie Raper. “Reducing Self-Selection Bias in Feeder Cattle Premium Estimates Using Matched Sampling.” Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 2014.

Williams, Brian, Eric DeVuyst, Darrell Peel, and Kellie Raper. “The likelihood of positive returns from value-added calf management practices.” Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics. 2014.