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  • Cotton and Wool Outlook: October 2012

    CWS-12H, October 12, 2012

    The latest USDA projections for U.S. and world cotton supply and demand are presented and discussed in this report. Relevant fiber data tables and charts are also provided.

  • Cotton and Wool Outlook: September 2012

    CWS-12G, September 13, 2012

    The latest USDA projections for U.S. and world cotton supply and demand are presented and discussed in this report. Relevant fiber data tables and charts also are provided.

  • Cotton and Wool Outlook: August 2012

    CWS-12F, August 13, 2012

    The latest USDA projections for U.S. and world cotton supply and demand are presented and discussed in this report. Relevant fiber data tables and charts also are provided.

  • Cotton and Wool Outlook: July 2012

    CWS-12E, July 12, 2012

    The latest USDA projections for U.S. and world cotton supply and demand are presented and discussed in this report. Relevant fiber data tables and charts also are provided.

  • Cotton and Wool Outlook: June 2012

    CWS-12D, June 13, 2012

    The latest U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) projections for 2012/13 indicate that world cotton stocks are expected to rise for the third consecutive season, reaching a new record. Global ending stocks are currently projected at 74.5 million bales for 2012/13, nearly 11 percent or 7.2 million bales above 2011/12 (fig. 1).

  • Cotton and Wool Outlook: April 2012

    CWS-12B, April 12, 2012

    The latest U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) cotton forecast for 2011/12 projects global cotton consumption to decrease for the second consecutive season. With recent high cotton prices that encouraged fiber substitution and the global economic uncertainty facing consumers, world mill use is projected to decrease to its lowest since 2003/04.

  • U.S. Net Textile and Apparel Imports Decline in 2011

    CWS-12A, March 12, 2012

    U.S. net textile and apparel fiber imports decreased in calendar year 2011 as a result of the sluggish U.S. economy. Total fiber product imports reached 17.2 billion raw-fiber-equivalent pounds in 2011, 7 percent below 2010 and the second lowest since 2004. Meanwhile, fiber product exports rose for the second consecutive year to 3.7 billion pounds after a recent low of 3.1 billion in 2009. As a result, 2011 net fiber product imports only reached 13.5 billion pounds, 9 percent below 2010 and one of the lowest since the mid-2000s (fig. 1).

  • Foreign Cotton Consumption/Production Gap Reduced

    CWS-11H, October 13, 2011

    The latest U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) cotton projections for 2011/12 indicate that the gap between foreign consumption and production is projected to decrease significantly this season and fall below 5 million bales for the first time since 2004/05 (fig. 1).

  • Brazil's Cotton Industry: Economic Reform and Development

    CWS-11D01, June 17, 2011

    This report identifies the factors contributing to the cycles in Brazil's cotton production and exports that have made the country both an important market for U.S. cotton exports and now a competitor with U.S. cotton producers since 1990.

  • Trends In U.S. Cotton Basis Since 2001

    CWS-09D01, June 25, 2009

    Price volatility in 2008 generated interest in underlying cotton cash and futures markets and highlighted the importance of market participants' expectations about basis changes over time in production, marketing, and hedging decisions. This analysis examines trends in average U.S. cotton basis and changes in the convergence of cash and futures prices as cotton futures contract expiration dates near between 2001 and 2009 to provide perspective for the average basis movements experienced in 2008. Though this analysis does not identify the factors leading to differences in average convergence paths since 2001, it finds that, while average cotton cash and futures prices converged in all years, the pattern in 2008 was significantly different from the other sample years.

  • Fiber Use for Textiles and China's Cotton Textile Exports

    CWS-08I-01, March 03, 2009

    New information about the role of recycling in the textile industry and updated estimates of efficiency in spinning lower estimates of the volume of cotton fiber exported by China in the form of textiles from those of an earlier study. China's textile industry not only meets domestic demand of the world's most populous country but is also the world's largest exporter. Consequently, China is the world's largest consumer and importer of cotton, but information about China's cotton consumption is incomplete. This analysis of China's textile trade offers important insights into trends in China's cotton use and imports. The revised textile trade estimates have implications for the outlook for China's cotton consumption and imports, which this study demonstrates with an econometric model of China's textile trade.

  • China's Cotton Supply and Demand: Issues and Impact on the World Market

    CWS-07I-01, November 06, 2007

    USDA has developed a new approach for estimating cotton consumption in China based on textile import and export data, supplementing the traditional methodology that uses yarn production data from China's National Bureau of Statistics. This analysis suggests USDA's historical estimates of China's cotton consumption are reasonable and USDA's August 2007 forecast may be conservative. These insights into the amount of cotton consumed by China's textile mills, combined with data on China's cotton exports and imports, suggest there may be problems with the official estimates of China's cotton production. Uncertainties regarding the level of production and consumption of cotton in China mean that the potential remains for unexpected changes in China's cotton import demand that could destabilize world commodity markets despite increased global communication. These unexpected changes highlight China's impact on world cotton markets and the lack of transparency in China's intervention in its domestic cotton markets and official cotton stock accumulation.

  • Cotton Backgrounder

    CWS-07B01, March 30, 2007

    U.S. cotton growers, like producers of other agricultural commodities in recent years, have confronted pressures from market forces and the impacts of policy developments, both domestic and international. Most notably, the ending of the Multifiber Arrangement (MFA) sent a ripple effect throughout the global cotton industry. While adjustments in the textile and apparel sectors of many countries, including the United States, continue to evolve, dramatic changes have already been seen for some. World cotton mill use has accelerated along with economic growth since 1999, particularly in China, and U.S. cotton producers have benefited as foreign import demand has reached new heights. Government payments contribute a considerable portion of total revenue to the cotton sector, and adjustments to this program or any other commodity program in the 2007 farm legislation will be driven by factors such as domestic market conditions, multilateral trade negotiations, and the Federal budget deficit.

  • Growth Prospects for India's Cotton and Textile Industries

    CWS-05D01, June 02, 2005

    India's prospects are changing now that the Multifiber Arrangement (MFA) no longer governs world textile trade. Decades of industrial policies that were both inward-oriented and biased toward small-scale production continue to influence India's textile trade prospects. While the recent introduction of genetically-modified (Bt) cotton has revitalized prospects for cotton production, quality issues are likely to hamper Indian cotton sales until the structure of India's cotton marketing system changes significantly.

  • The Forces Shaping World Cotton Consumption After the Multifiber Arrangement

    CWS-05C-01, April 15, 2005

    The phaseout of the Multifiber Arrangement (MFA) and other forces are reshaping world textile and cotton markets. The elimination of the MFA is helping reduce clothing prices in the United States and the EU and effecting a shift in industrial demand for cotton to China, India, and Pakistan. At the same time, world cotton consumption has accelerated along with economic growth since 1999, especially in developing Asia, where an emerging consumer society is driving increases in household consumption of clothing and other cotton products. In the long run, income growth and technical change have more of an effect on world cotton consumption than the elimination of the MFA.

  • Cotton: Background and Issues for Farm Legislation

    CWS-0601-01, August 01, 2001

    Since passage of the 1996 farm legislation, U.S. cotton production and demand have nearly equaled each other, keeping stocks virtually unchanged. However, U.S. cotton producers have experienced deteriorating product prices coupled with declining yields during this period. Farm prices for upland cotton dropped 40 percent from their recent peak in 1995/96 to 45 cents per pound in 1999/2000, prompting considerable concern for the industry as the new farm legislation debate develops.