Publications

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  • Why Have Food Commodity Prices Risen Again?

    WRS-1103, June 28, 2011

    The report describes the factors that have contributed to the large and rapid increase in agricultural prices during the past year. The report focuses particularly on food commodity prices-which have risen 60 percent since June 2010.

  • While Crop Rotations Are Common, Cover Crops Remain Rare

    Amber Waves, March 04, 2013

    While 82-94 percent of most U.S. crops are grown in some sort of rotation, conservation crop rotations that incorporate cover crops remain rare. Only about 3 to 7 percent of farms use cover crops in rotations, and, since they do not put all of their land into cover crops, only 1 percent of cropland acreage uses cover crops.

  • Where Did the Corn Come From To Fuel the Expansion in Ethanol Production?

    Amber Waves, September 01, 2011

    Between 2000 and 2009, U.S. ethanol production increased from 1.6 billion gallons to 10.8 billion gallons, almost all of which was produced from corn. Some of the corn came from increased yields and some was diverted from other uses, but much of the corn needed to produce ethanol came from expanding planted acreage.

  • Wheat Price Discovery Remains Concentrated in the United States, but Shifting to Europe

    Amber Waves, October 02, 2017

    A recent study finds that while the United States is still responsible for the majority of price discovery in wheat markets, European markets are gaining influence.

  • Wheat Outlook: March 2009

    WHS-09C01, March 24, 2009

    The recent historic rise in farm input costs and wheat prices has had economic effects on the U.S. wheat sector. A cumulative distribution of forecasted production costs for wheat farms shows that current high (but falling) wheat prices will allow a greater share of producers to cover their production costs in 2008 (90 percent) than in 2004 (82 percent), despite higher input costs in 2008. However, if farm-gate prices for wheat continue to fall into 2009, and if prices for inputs do not drop off similarly, many more wheat producers may find themselves unable to cover production costs and the U.S. wheat sector may see further attrition of planted area.

  • Wheat Flour Price Shocks and Household Food Security in Afghanistan

    ERR-121, July 12, 2011

    Using a nationally representative household survey from Afghanistan, ERS analyzes the impact of increases in wheat flour prices before and during the 2007/08 global food price crisis.

  • Volume Production Keeps Floriculture Prices Low

    Amber Waves, February 01, 2004

    Recent trends towards volume production and mass marketing of flowers and bedding and garden plants have put downward pressure on prices, leading to a restructuring of the industry.

  • Vegetables and Pulses Outlook; December 2012

    VGS-352, December 18, 2012

    The 2012 U.S. dry bean crop is expected to reach 31.8 million cwt, an increase of almost 60 percent from low production levels of 2011.

  • Vegetables and Pulses Outlook: September 2014

    VGS-354, September 30, 2014

    Despite the decrease in domestic production of fresh-market vegetables, both producer and consumer prices are down as import volumes fill the gaps.

  • Vegetables and Pulses Outlook: September 2012

    VGS-351, September 27, 2012

    Use of chickpeas (garbanzo beans) has increased in the United States as consumption of food such as humus expands. I n 2012, a record 196,900 acres were planted with Washington, Idaho, and California leading producers in the previous year.

  • Vegetables and Pulses Outlook: October 2017

    VGS-359, October 27, 2017

    Flooding, hurricanes, and drought disrupt otherwise strong vegetable and dry pulse markets.

  • Vegetables and Pulses Outlook: May 2015

    VGS-355, May 01, 2015

    Total vegetables and pulses output volume rose 5 percent in 2014 despite ongoing drought and water shortages in California, where 40 percent of U.S. vegetables and pulses are grown.

  • Vegetables and Pulses Outlook: March 2013

    VGS-353, March 29, 2013

    According to the California Processing Tomato Report, National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA, California tomato processors intend to contract 2.8 percent more processing tomatoes in 2013 than the previous year.

  • Vegetables and Pulses Outlook: June 2012

    VGS-350, June 28, 2012

    Prices at the point of first sale remain low for most fresh-market vegetables and consumer prices also fell in the first 5 months of 2012. Volumes are strong as mild winter and early spring temperatures allowed early planting in many areas. Per capita use of fresh-market vegetables fell less than 1 percent in 2011 compared to the previous year.

  • Vegetables and Pulses Outlook: August 2016

    VGS-357, August 30, 2016

    Dry Edible Peas Harvested Area at Record-High.

  • Vegetables and Pulses Outlook: April 2017

    VGS-358, April 28, 2017

    On a per capita basis, the total volume of vegetables and pulses averaged 383 pounds in 2016—up 2 percent from last year.

  • Vegetables and Pulses Outlook: April 2016

    VGS-356, April 29, 2016

    U.S. production of commercial vegetables and dry pulses (including mushrooms, potatoes, and sweet potatoes) totaled 127 billion pounds in 2015, down less than 1 percent from 2014.

  • Vegetables and Melons Outlook: September 2009

    VGS-328-01, September 09, 2008

    Vegetable and melon production requires a substantial investment in production inputs. Using data from USDA's Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS), this article presents and explores the major expense components of specialized U.S. and regional vegetable and melon farms during 1998-2006. Total cash expenses per acre for specialized U.S. vegetable and melon farms increased 32 percent between 1998-2000 and 2004-06 and were highest in the West and lowest in the Midwest. Labor accounted for 30 percent of U.S. cash expenses, followed by fertilizer and agricultural chemicals at 18 percent.

  • Vegetables and Melons Outlook: March 2007

    VGS-31901, March 06, 2007

    Carrots are one of the most popular vegetables in the United States and fresh-market carrot consumption has been increasing over the past few decades. Using a combination of ACNielsen Homescan panel data and USDA's Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals, this article examines where and how much fresh and processed carrots are eaten and links this consumption to various economic, social, and demographic characteristics of consumers. The analysis indicates that per capita carrot consumption is greatest in the East and Central regions of the country. About 80 percent of fresh-market carrots are purchased at retail and consumed at home, with the majority consisting of fresh-cut (including baby) carrots.

  • Vegetables and Melons Outlook: August 2011

    VGS-346, August 25, 2011

    The farm value of all mushroom (Agaricus and others) sales during the 2010/11 crop year (July-June) reached a new high of $1 billion, up 8 percent from a year earlier. Partly reflecting modest gains in the economy, mushroom sales volume rose 9 percent to 862 million pounds, the second highest level on record. In line with higher output, per capita disappearance (use) of all mushrooms grew 8 percent to 3.82 pounds in 2010/11.