Publications

Sort by: Title | Date
  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: May 2017

    LDP-M-275, May 16, 2017

    The Livestock, Dairy, & Poultry Outlook for May 2017 analyzes economic impacts on animal product markets of month-to-month changes in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Use Estimates Report.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: November 2012

    LDPM-221, November 16, 2012

    Meat production is trimmed in 2013.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: November 2013

    LDPM-233, November 15, 2013

    Lower Feed Grain Prices Improve Margins.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: November 2015

    LDPM-257, November 17, 2015

    The Livestock, Dairy, & Poultry Outlook for November 2015 analyzes animal product markets based on projections from USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Use Estimates report for beef, pork, poultry, lamb, and dairy production and trade.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: November 2016

    LDPM-269, November 16, 2016

    The Livestock, Dairy, & Poultry Outlook for November 2016 analyzes economic impacts on animal product markets of month-to-month changes in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Use Estimates Report.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: November 2017

    LDPM-281, November 16, 2017

    The Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook for November 2017 analyzes economic impacts on animal product markets of month-to-month changes in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Use Estimates Report.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: October 2011

    LDPM-208, October 18, 2011

    Drought-induced cow-herd liquidation has reduced average dressed weights and resulted in relatively more ground products but fewer middle cuts. Wheat pasture could be priced at a premium this winter. Cattle feeding margins remain negative despite higher fed cattle prices.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: October 2012

    LDPM-220, October 17, 2012

    Ample supplies of pork and poultry moderate prices.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: September 2011

    LDPM-207, September 16, 2011

    Beef/Cattle: Drought conditions continue to result in Southern cows going to slaughter and Southern calves going to feedlots. Also resulting from the drought, corn, and hay prices are increasing as cow and fed cattle prices slip. Despite deteriorating feed-fed cattle price relationships, feeder cattle prices appear mostly steady.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: September 2012

    LDPM-219, September 18, 2012

    Impacts of high feed prices shake out across markets.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: September 2013

    LDPM-231, September 18, 2013

    Corn-Belt Dryness Tweaks Meat Sectors

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: September 2015

    LDPM-255, September 17, 2015

    The Livestock, Dairy, & Poultry Outlook for September 2015 analyzes animal product markets based on projections from USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Use Estimates report for beef, pork, poultry, lamb, and dairy production and trade.

  • Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook: September 2016

    LDPM-267, September 16, 2016

    The Livestock, Dairy, & Poultry Outlook for September 2016 analyzes economic impacts on animal product markets of month-to-month changes in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Use Estimates Report.

  • Local Meat and Poultry Processing: The Importance of Business Commitments for Long-Term Viability

    ERR-150, June 18, 2013

    Consumer demand for local local meat has risen in recent years. Farmers contend that limited processing capacity restricts supply, while processors often lack the consistent business required to make a profit.

  • Making Sense of Recent Cost-of-Foodborne-Illness Estimates

    EIB-118, September 30, 2013

    ERS examines estimates of the cost of foodborne illness, focusing on factors that result in different estimates. Factors include the number of pathogens included in estimates and the method of assigning monetary value to the impacts.

  • Managing the Costs of Reducing Agriculture’s Footprint on the Chesapeake Bay

    Amber Waves, July 07, 2014

    Runoff from agricultural activity and other nonpoint sources contributes to adverse environmental conditions in the Chesapeake Bay, interfering with fish and shellfish production and compromising recreational opportunities. In order to meet Environmental Protection Agency goals for the Chesapeake Bay, loadings of nutrients and sediments from agricultural activity must be reduced.

  • Mandatory Price Reporting, Market Efficiency, and Price Discovery in Livestock Markets

    LDPM-254-01, September 03, 2015

    ERS found that the Livestock Mandatory Reporting Act, up for renewal in 2015, has improved the markets' overall speed in absorbing new information and that it generally benefits livestock feeders, meatpackers, and-ultimately-consumers.

  • Manure Use for Fertilizer and for Energy: Report to Congress

    AP-037, June 25, 2009

    The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 directed the U.S. Department of Agriculture to evaluate the role of animal manure as a source of fertilizer, and its other uses. About 5 percent of all U.S. cropland is currently fertilized with livestock manure, and corn accounts for over half of the acreage to which manure is applied. Expanded environmental regulation through nutrient management plans will likely lead to wider use of manure on cropland, at higher production costs, but with only modest impacts on production costs, commodity demand, or farm structure. There is widespread interest in using manure as a feedstock for energy production. While current use is quite limited, expanded government support, either direct or indirectly, could lead to a substantial increase in manure use as a feedstock. However, current energy processes are unlikely to compete with fertilizer uses of manure, because they leave fertilizer nutrients as residues, in more marketable form, and because manure-to-energy projects will be most profitable in regions where raw manure is in excess supply, with the least value as fertilizer.

  • Market Integration in the North American Hog Industries

    LDPM-12501, November 24, 2004

    About 8 percent of the hogs slaughtered in the United States in 2004 will originate in Canada-many more than 10 years ago. Canadian hogs have flowed into the United States in response to significant structural changes in the U.S. pork industry, concurrent with policy changes in Canada. This, combined with a strong U.S./Canadian dollar exchange rate, created incentives to expand hog operations in Ontario and to start production in Manitoba. In 15 years, an open border and pronounced breeding herd efficiencies helped to increase Canadian hog exports to the United States by more than eight-fold.

  • Market Integration of the North American Animal Products Complex

    LDPM-13101, May 26, 2005

    The beef, pork, and poultry industries of Mexico, Canada, and the United States have tended to become more economically integrated over the past two decades. Sanitary barriers, which are designed to protect people and animals from diseases, are some of the most significant barriers to fuller integration of meat and animal markets. In addition, diseases such as Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease, have caused major disruptions to beef and cattle trade.