Publications

Sort by: Title | Date
  • Research Areas

    Amber Waves, November 01, 2006

    Research area charts from the November 2006 issue of Amber Waves.

  • Indicators

    Amber Waves, November 01, 2006

    Indicators tables from the November 2006 issue of Amber Waves.

  • Research Areas

    Amber Waves, February 01, 2007

    Research area charts from the February 2007 issue of Amber Waves

  • Promising Economic Outlook for Agricultural Sector Continues in 2007

    Amber Waves, February 01, 2007

    Promising Economic Outlook for Agricultural Sector Continues in 2007

  • In The Long Run

    Amber Waves, February 01, 2007

    Government transfer payments to individuals increased steadily in both metro and nonmetro areas between 1969 and 2004.

  • 2006 Farm Net Cash Income Expected To Decline Slightly

    Amber Waves, February 01, 2007

    This article provides a summary of updated forecasts of value-added and various income measures from production activities in 2006 for the U.S. farm sector, plus the associated forecast of the farm balance sheet. Forecast includes the latest economic information based on crop harvests and livestock production for the 2006 calendar year.

  • Feed Grains Backgrounder

    FDS-07C01, March 30, 2007

    The U.S. feed grain sector, largest of the major U.S. field crops, faces unprecedented demand conditions. The size and speed of the expanding use of corn by the ethanol industry is raising widespread issues throughout U.S. agriculture. Debate is ongoing over the use of grain for fuel instead of for food or feed and the adequacy of future grain supplies. Increased productivity (yield) and additional area from land planted to competing crops, land enrolled in conservation programs, or idled land is expected to provide an increased supply of feed grains. The outlook is for higher feed grain prices, in part, as a result of renewable energy policies and high energy prices, with feed grain prices rising above farm program support levels. During the ongoing farm policy debate, the U.S. feed grain sector faces uncertainty about the future level and type of government support.

  • Cotton Backgrounder

    CWS-07B01, March 30, 2007

    U.S. cotton growers, like producers of other agricultural commodities in recent years, have confronted pressures from market forces and the impacts of policy developments, both domestic and international. Most notably, the ending of the Multifiber Arrangement (MFA) sent a ripple effect throughout the global cotton industry. While adjustments in the textile and apparel sectors of many countries, including the United States, continue to evolve, dramatic changes have already been seen for some. World cotton mill use has accelerated along with economic growth since 1999, particularly in China, and U.S. cotton producers have benefited as foreign import demand has reached new heights. Government payments contribute a considerable portion of total revenue to the cotton sector, and adjustments to this program or any other commodity program in the 2007 farm legislation will be driven by factors such as domestic market conditions, multilateral trade negotiations, and the Federal budget deficit.

  • Experience Counts: Farm Business Survival in the U.S.

    Amber Waves, April 01, 2007

    Farming, like other businesses, exhibits high turnover, with many thousands of existing farms going out of business each year. As in other industries, new farm businesses enter at a high rate and new entrants subsequently exit at high rates, irrespective of the size of the farm or the age of the operator. Exit rates fall as businesses age to 5-9 years old, and then fall again, although modestly, for more experienced farm businesses. Experience seems to provide an important advantage to well-established businesses that can learn quickly and efficiently.

  • Indicators

    Amber Waves, April 01, 2007

    Indicators tables from the April 2007 issue of Amber Waves.

  • Research Areas

    Amber Waves, April 01, 2007

    Resource area charts from the April 2007 issue of Amber Waves.

  • Data Feature

    Amber Waves, April 01, 2007

    ERS ARMS data allow detailed comparisons of a number of characteristics of farms specializing in wheat, corn, cotton, and fruit and vegetable production. For example, wheat and cotton farms tend to be the largest and are also the least specialized, planting less than 50 percent of their acres to their main crop. Fruit and vegetable farms are the smallest and also derived the highest share of their income from off-farm activities.

  • In The Long Run

    Amber Waves, May 01, 2007

    Farm population has fallen steadily as a share of total U.S. population for more than a century. Less than half the U.S. population has lived on farms since these data were first collected in 1880.

  • The Importance of Farm Program Payments to Farm Households

    Amber Waves, June 01, 2007

    Less than half of all farms-43 percent in 2005-receive farm program payments. Large family farms represent 8 percent of all farms but they receive 58 percent of commodity program payments going to farms. Two-thirds of recipient farms receive less than $10,000 in payments, accounting for only 7 percent of their gross cash farm. Payments represent 13 percent of gross cash farm income for those that receive more than $30,000 in payments.

  • Indicators

    Amber Waves, June 01, 2007

    Indicators tables from the June 2007 issue of Amber Waves.

  • Structure and Finances of U.S. Farms: Family Farm Report, 2007 Edition

    EIB-24, June 01, 2007

    U.S. farms are diverse, ranging from small retirement and residential farms to enterprises with annual sales in the millions. Nevertheless, most U.S. farms-98 percent in 2004-are family farms. Even the largest farms tend to be family farms. Large-scale family farms and nonfamily farms account for 10 percent of U.S farms, but 75 percent of the value of production. In contrast, small family farms make up most of the U.S. farm count, produce a modest share of farm output, and receive substantial off-farm income. Many farm households have a large net worth, reflecting the land-intensive nature of farming.

  • Latest Indicators Point to Continued Strength of Farm Finances

    Amber Waves, September 01, 2007

    U.S. agriculture relied entirely on growth in total factor productivity (TFP) rather than input accumulation to expand output between 1948 and 2004. TFP growth in agriculture accounted for 12 percent of all TFP growth in the U.S. private economy between 1960 and 2004.

  • U.S. Ethanol Expansion Driving Changes Throughout the Agricultural Sector

    Amber Waves, September 03, 2007

    A large expansion in ethanol production is underway in the United States, spurred by high oil prices and energy policies. Although corn is the primary feedstock used to produce ethanol in the United States, market adjustments to the ethanol expansion extend well beyond the corn sector to supply and demand for other crops, as well as to the livestock sector, farm income, government payments, and food prices. Adjustments in the agricultural sector to increased demand for biofuels will continue as interest grows in renewable sources of energy to lessen dependence on foreign oil.

  • Indicators

    Amber Waves, September 03, 2007

    Indicators tables from the September 2007 issue of Amber Waves.

  • Research Areas

    Amber Waves, September 03, 2007

    Research area charts from the September 2007 issue of Amber Waves.