Publications

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  • Emerging Energy Industries and Rural Growth

    ERR-159, November 21, 2013

    Production of wind power, corn-based ethanol, and unconventionally extracted natural gas more than doubled overall from 2000 to 2010. ERS looks at the contribution these emerging-energy industries have made to local economies.

  • Energy Policies Could Drive Ethanol Trade

    Amber Waves, September 08, 2015

    Energy policies affect trade in biofuels. This finding focuses on bilateral trade between the United States and Brazil and also offers insights into potential future changes in U.S. ethanol trade, which will mostly depend on domestic energy policies and policies in major ethanol producing countries.

  • Estimating the Substitution of Distillers' Grains for Corn and Soybean Meal in the U.S. Feed Complex

    FDS-11I01, October 13, 2011

    Corn-based dry-mill ethanol production and its coproducts - notably distillers' dried grains with soluble (DDGS) - have surged in recent years. The report estimates the potential substitution of DDGS for corn and soybean meal in livestock feeding and the impact of substitution upon the U.S. feed complex.

  • Ethanol Reduces Government Support for U.S. Feed Grain Sector

    Amber Waves, April 01, 2007

    Increasing use of corn for ethanol production has brought a shift in the type of Government support received by U.S. corn producers. Previously, income support comprised the largest share of support going to the corn sector. Now, however, feed grain producers are relying more on indirect demand enhancement coming from government policies stimulating ethanol production. The most important instrument is a blenders tax credit available to gasoline marketers.

  • Ethanol Reshapes the Corn Market

    Amber Waves, April 01, 2006

    This article examines the possible market impacts of the ongoing expansion of the U.S. ethanol sector. To meet the sector's growing demand for corn, some of the corn produced in the United States is likely to be diverted from exports. In the future, corn may cease to be the main feedstock for U.S. ethanol production if cellulosic biomass is successfully developed as an alternative.

  • Ethanol Reshapes the Corn Market—Updated

    Amber Waves, May 01, 2007

    This article examines the possible market impacts of the ongoing expansion of the U.S. ethanol sector. To meet the sector's growing demand for corn, some U.S. corn is likely to be diverted from exports and feed. In the future, corn may cease to be the main feedstock for U.S. ethanol production if cellulosic biomass is successfully developed as an alternative.

  • Ethanol Strengthens the Link Between Agriculture and Energy Markets

    Amber Waves, June 05, 2012

    The growing role of the ethanol industry as a supplier to the U.S. motor fuels market has reshaped the relationship between agriculture and energy markets. Price relationships between the U.S. corn and gasoline markets strengthened after March 2008 and continue to be highly correlated.

  • Ethanol and a Changing Agricultural Landscape

    ERR-86, November 18, 2009

    The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 established specific targets for the production of biofuel in the United States. Until advanced technologies become commercially viable, meeting these targets will increase demand for traditional agricultural commodities used to produce ethanol, resulting in land-use, production, and price changes throughout the farm sector. This report summarizes the estimated effects of meeting the EISA targets for 2015 on regional agricultural production and the environment. Meeting EISA targets for ethanol production is estimated to expand U.S. cropped acreage by nearly 5 million acres by 2015, an increase of 1.6 percent over what would otherwise be expected. Much of the growth comes from corn acreage, which increases by 3.5 percent over baseline projections. Water quality and soil carbon will also be affected, in some cases by greater percentages than suggested by changes in the amount of cropped land. The economic and environmental implications of displacing a portion of corn ethanol production with ethanol produced from crop residues are also estimated.

  • Feed Grains Backgrounder

    FDS-07C01, March 30, 2007

    The U.S. feed grain sector, largest of the major U.S. field crops, faces unprecedented demand conditions. The size and speed of the expanding use of corn by the ethanol industry is raising widespread issues throughout U.S. agriculture. Debate is ongoing over the use of grain for fuel instead of for food or feed and the adequacy of future grain supplies. Increased productivity (yield) and additional area from land planted to competing crops, land enrolled in conservation programs, or idled land is expected to provide an increased supply of feed grains. The outlook is for higher feed grain prices, in part, as a result of renewable energy policies and high energy prices, with feed grain prices rising above farm program support levels. During the ongoing farm policy debate, the U.S. feed grain sector faces uncertainty about the future level and type of government support.

  • Feed Grains Outlook: January 2015

    FDS-15A, January 14, 2015

    The January 2015 Feed Grains Outlook report contains projections for the 2014/15 U.S. and global feed markets based on the most current World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates.

  • Feed Outlook: August 2016

    FDS-16H, August 16, 2016

    The August 2016 Feed Outlook report contains projections for the 2015/16 and 2016/17 U.S. and global feed markets based on the most current World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates.

  • Feed Outlook: April 2009

    FDS-09D01, April 01, 2009

    The byproducts of making ethanol, sweeteners, syrups, and oils used to be considered less valuable than the primary products. But the increased livestock-feed market for such byproducts in the past few years has switched that perception to one of the ethanol industry making grain-based "co-products" that have market value separate from the primary products. Co-products such as dried distiller's grains, corn gluten feed, corn gluten meal, corn oil, solubles, and brewer's grains have become economically viable components, along with traditional ingredients (such as corn, soybean meal, and urea), in feed rations.

  • Feed Outlook: April 2013

    FDS-13D, April 12, 2013

    Lower than expected March 1 corn stocks roil markets, lower price, and raise ending stocks.

  • Feed Outlook: April 2014

    FDS-14D, April 11, 2014

    The April 2014 Feed Grains Outlook report contains projections for the 2013/14 U.S. and global feed markets based on the most current World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates.

  • Feed Outlook: April 2015

    FDS-15D, April 13, 2015

    The April 2015 Feed Outlook report contains projections for the 2014/15 U.S. and global feed markets based on the most current World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report.

  • Feed Outlook: April 2016

    FDS-16D, April 14, 2016

    The April 2016 Feed Outlook report contains projections for the 2015/16 U.S. and global feed markets based on the most current World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates.

  • Feed Outlook: April 2017

    FDS-17d, April 13, 2017

    The April 2017 Feed Outlook report contains projections for the 2016/17 U.S. and global feed markets based on the most current World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates.

  • Feed Outlook: April 2018

    FDS-18d, April 12, 2018

    The April 2018 Feed Outlook report contains estimates for 2016/17 and projections for 2017/18 U.S. and global feed markets based on the most current World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates.

  • Feed Outlook: August 2012

    FDS-12H, August 14, 2012

    Market analysis of domestic and international feed grain markets.

  • Feed Outlook: August 2014

    FDS-14H, August 14, 2014

    The August 2014 Feed Grains Outlook report contains projections for the 2014/15 U.S. and global feed markets based on the most current World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates.