Publications

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  • Indicators

    Amber Waves, September 01, 2005

    Farm, Rural, Natural Resources and Food and Fiber Sector Indicators - September 2005

  • In the Long Run: Another Look at Farm Poverty

    Amber Waves, September 01, 2005

    In 1991, the last year it was estimated by the Census Bureau, the farm poverty rate was 12.5 percent. Using 2000 Census data, ERS estimated the poverty rate for people living on farms at 9.7 percent.

  • Behind the Data: Estimating the Raw-Fiber Equivalent of U.S. Cotton Textile and Apparel Imports

    Amber Waves, September 01, 2005

    The data behind the ERS raw-fiber equivalent estimates come from product-specific shipment volumes collected by the U.S. Department of Commerce. More than 3,000 different textile and apparel products containing cotton are imported by the U.S. annually and are converted to raw-fiber equivalents using factors developed by ERS.

  • Research Areas

    Amber Waves, September 01, 2005

    Indicators: Markets and Trade, Diet and Health, Resources and Environment and Rural America - September 2005

  • Dairy Policies in Japan

    LDPM-134-01, August 24, 2005

    This report provides a detailed description and analysis of Japan's policies that support its milk producers and regulate dairy markets. Domestic supply controls boost the milk price, and government subsidies for producing manufacturing milk, for environmental improvements, and for hazard insurance provide additional support to farms. Regulations about milk labeling have affected milk powder use. At the border, tariff-rate quotas offer limited opportunities to private firms within the quota amounts, and impose very high tariffs on imports of dairy products outside the quota. If Japan's policies were liberalized, prices and production in Japan would fall, but sizable milk production would remain.

  • U.S. Fruit and Vegetable Imports Outpace Exports

    Amber Waves, June 01, 2005

    The U.S., traditionally a net exporter of fruits and vegetables, has become a large net importer, with imports more than doubling between 1994 and 2004 to reach $12.7 billion. U.S. exports of fruits and vegetables have also risen but less rapidly, reaching $9.7 billion in 2004.

  • Indicators

    Amber Waves, June 01, 2005

    Selected statistics on agriculture and trade, diet and health, natural resources, and rural America, June 2014 June 2005

  • Research Areas

    Amber Waves, June 01, 2005

    Indicators: Markets and Trade, Diet and Health, Resources and Environment and Rural America - June 2005

  • Market Integration of the North American Animal Products Complex

    LDPM-13101, May 26, 2005

    The beef, pork, and poultry industries of Mexico, Canada, and the United States have tended to become more economically integrated over the past two decades. Sanitary barriers, which are designed to protect people and animals from diseases, are some of the most significant barriers to fuller integration of meat and animal markets. In addition, diseases such as Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease, have caused major disruptions to beef and cattle trade.

  • Production Costs and Returns for Tobacco in 2003

    TBS-258-01, May 13, 2005

    Average net returns per acre were estimated to be negative for burley and flue-cured tobacco in 2003. Total economic costs for burley and flue-cured tobacco production likely rose in 2003 from 2002 due to higher costs for energy, labor, and quota rental rates. Cost estimates are computed using production data from the last tobacco surveys, conducted in 1995 for burley tobacco and 1996 for flue-cured tobacco, and 2003 data on prices, yields, marketing costs, and quota levels.

  • Factors Affecting U.S. Pork Consumption

    LDPM-13001, May 12, 2005

    Pork ranks third in annual U.S. meat consumption, behind beef and chicken, averaging 51 pounds per person. The Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII) indicates that most pork is consumed at home. Pork consumption is highest in the Midwest, followed by the South, the Northeast, and the West. Rural consumers eat more pork than urban/suburban consumers. Pork consumption varies by race and ethnicity. Higher income consumers tend to consume less pork. Everything else remaining constant, demographic data in the CSFII suggests future declines in per capita pork consumption as the share of Hispanics and the elderly in the population rises because those two groups eat less pork than the national average. However, total U.S. pork consumption will grow because of an expansion of the U.S. population.

  • Indicators

    Amber Waves, April 01, 2005

    Farm, Rural, Natural Resources and Food and Fiber Sector Indicators - April 2005

  • Research Areas

    Amber Waves, April 01, 2005

    Indicators: Markets and Trade, Diet and Health, Resources and Environment and Rural America - April 2005

  • Behind the Data

    Amber Waves, April 01, 2005

    Indicators: Behind the Data - April 2005

  • Long-Lived Tobacco Program to End

    Amber Waves, February 01, 2005

    In October 2004, Congress passed legislation that eliminates tobacco quota and price support programs at the end of the 2004 crop year. Quota holders and producers will be compensated for the quota they own and produce. The buyout will be financed by assessments on tobacco product manufacturers and importers. With the elimination of quota and price support, tobacco production is likely to move to regions amenable to mechanization and where adequate economies of scale can be achieved and U.S. prices could fall 30-40 percent.

  • Behind the Data

    Amber Waves, February 01, 2005

    Indicators: Behind the Data - February 2005

  • On the Map

    Amber Waves, February 01, 2005

    Indicators: On the Map - February 2005

  • Indicators

    Amber Waves, February 01, 2005

    Farm, Rural, Natural Resources and Food and Fiber Sector Indicators - February 2005

  • Market Access for High-Value Foods

    AER-840, February 01, 2005

    This report examines global food trade patterns and the role of WTO market access rules in shaping the composition of global food trade.

  • In the Long Run

    Amber Waves, February 01, 2005

    Indicators: In the Long Run - February 2005