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  • NAFTA at 15: Building on Free Trade

    WRS-09-03, March 31, 2009

    Implementation of the agricultural provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has drawn to a close. In 2008, the last of NAFTA's transitional restrictions governing U.S.-Mexico and Canada-Mexico agricultural trade were removed, concluding a 14-year project in which the member countries systematically dismantled numerous barriers to regional agricultural trade. During the implementation period, the agricultural sectors of Canada, Mexico, and the United States have become much more integrated. Agricultural trade within the free-trade area has grown dramatically, and Canadian and Mexican industries that rely on U.S. agricultural inputs have expanded. U.S. feedstuffs have facilitated a marked increase in Mexican meat production and consumption, and the importance of Canadian and Mexican produce to U.S. fruit and vegetable consumption is growing.

  • NAFTA at 20: North America's Free-Trade Area and Its Impact on Agriculture

    WRS-15-01, February 02, 2015

    In 20 years after NAFTA's implementation, U.S. agricultural exports to Canada and Mexico increased from $8.9 billion to $39.5 billion, while U.S. agricultural imports from these trading partners rose from $7.4 billion to $39.4 billion.

  • NAFTA at 20: With Regional Trade Liberalization Complete, Focus Shifts to Other Methods of Deepening Economic Integration

    Amber Waves, April 06, 2015

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)—implemented in 1994 by Canada, Mexico, and the United States—has resulted in expanded flows of intraregional agricultural trade and substantial levels of foreign direct investment in the processed food sector. A more integrated North American market in oilseeds, grains is one the more important impacts of NAFTA in the agricultural sector.

  • NAFTA’s Liberalization of Corn Trade Approaches the Finish Line

    Amber Waves, September 03, 2007

    Implementation of NAFTA, signed in 1995 is nearly complete, and all remaining trade barriers among the U.S., Canada, and Mexico will be phased out in 2008. One of the few remaining commodities to be liberalized under NAFTA is corn, which has had a 14-year transition period. But the TRQ has become less restrictive over the period, so the final phase-out is not expected to generate much additional impact.

  • Next-Generation Biofuels: Near-Term Challenges and Implications for Agriculture

    BIO-01-01, May 14, 2010

    This report assesses the short-term outlook for production of next-generation biofuels and the near-term challenges facing the sector. Next-generation U.S. biofuel capacity should reach about 88 million gallons in 2010, thanks in large measure to one plant becoming commercially operational in 2010, using noncellulosic animal fat to produce green diesel. U.S. production capacity for cellulosic biofuels is estimated to be 10 million gallons for 2010, much less than the 100 million gallons originally mandated by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act. Near-term sector challenges include reducing high capital and production costs, acquiring financial resources for precommercial development, developing new biomass supply arrangements, many of which will be with U.S. farmers, and overcoming the constraints of ethanol's current 10-percent blending limit with gasoline.

  • Nitrogen Management on U.S. Corn Acres, 2001-10

    EB-20, November 14, 2012

    Nitrogen is a critical input in agriculture, and corn is the largest user of nitrogen. An examination of nitrogen management on corn cropland indicates that corn producers appear to be applying less excess nitrogen.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: August 2017

    OCS-17H, August 14, 2017

    Looming wave of soybean supplies may propel an export surge.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: July 2017

    OCS-17g, July 14, 2017

    The July 2017 Oil Crops Outlook analyzes the major changes and events in the world market for oilseeds and oilseed products.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: November 2015

    OCS-15K, November 13, 2015

    Abundant U.S. soybean stocks seen for 2015/16.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: September 2017

    OCS-17i, September 14, 2017

    Modestly higher soybean yields offset a reduced stocks carryover.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: April 2012

    OCS-12D, April 11, 2012

    USDA's Prospective Plantings report in March indicated that U.S. farmers intend to reduce the acreage sown to soybeans this year by 1.4 percent to 73.9 million acres as expected returns for corn were more attractive. Also, growers intend this spring to increase U.S. sunflowerseed acreage by 17 percent to 1.8 million acres, canola by 45 percent to a U.S.-record 1.56 million acres, and peanuts by 25 percent to 1.4 million acres.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: April 2013

    OCS-13D, April 12, 2013

    Prices ease after USDA reports larger than expected soybean stocks.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: April 2014

    OCS-14D, April 11, 2014

    Record 2014 soybean acreage heralds upsurge for currently tight stocks.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: April 2015

    OCS-15D, April 13, 2015

    U.S. soybean stocks getting worked down by record demand.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: April 2016

    OCS-16D, April 14, 2016

    Outlook for soybean ending stocks tightens but still ample.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: August 2012

    OCS-12H, August 13, 2012

    ERS -- working closely with the World Agricultural Outlook Board, the Foreign Agricultural Service, and other USDA agencies -- conducts market analysis and provides short- and long-term projections of U.S. and world agricultural production, consumption, and trade

  • Oil Crops Outlook: August 2013

    OCS-13H, August 14, 2013

    Rising competition, smaller crop gains seen limiting U.S. soybean demand.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: August 2014

    OCS-14H, August 14, 2014

    U.S. soybean yields rise with favorable weather.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: August 2015

    OCS-15H, August 14, 2015

    Soybean stocks to rise with higher crop and dimmer export outlook.

  • Oil Crops Outlook: August 2016

    OCS-16H, August 16, 2016

    Record acreage and yields swell U.S. soybean production.