Publications

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  • Will Hard White Wheat Become a Sustainable Wheat Class?

    Amber Waves, April 01, 2005

    Hard white winter wheat has attracted considerable interest among producers because of its unique end-use characteristics. In anticipation of growing demand in the Asian market, U.S. producers increased plantings dramatically. But future expansion and HWW’s eventual status as a separate wheat class is in some doubt as a result of its susceptibility to sprout damage.

  • Will 2005 Be the Year of the Whole Grain?

    Amber Waves, June 01, 2005

    The 2005 Dietary Guidelines encourage all Americans over age 2 to eat roughly half of their recommended 5 to 10 daily servings of grains, depending on calorie needs. The goal of this new recommendation is to improve Americans' health by raising awareness of whole grains and their role in nutritious diets. The Guidelines could also have big impacts on farmers and farm production.

  • Why Have Food Commodity Prices Risen Again?

    WRS-1103, June 28, 2011

    The report describes the factors that have contributed to the large and rapid increase in agricultural prices during the past year. The report focuses particularly on food commodity prices-which have risen 60 percent since June 2010.

  • Where Do Americans Usually Shop for Food and How Do They Travel To Get There? Initial Findings from the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey

    EIB-138, March 23, 2015

    This report compares food shopping patterns of (1) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) households to nonparticipant households, (2) participants in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for Women Infants and Children (WIC) to nonparticipants, and (3) food-insecure to food-secure households.

    Errata: On September 13, 2016, ERS revised the categorization of households with members categorically eligible for WIC to exclude households where the only categorically eligible member was a child age 5. These children were incorrectly included previously; imputed income measures were also used as these measures became available since the report’s release; revised survey weights were also used to update all estimates in the report. Because of these changes, all of the estimates in the report have been revised. However, the results were not numerically or substantively different after these revisions were made, with one exception— the result that WIC participants were more likely to use supercenters as their primary store was no longer statistically significant. The text has been adjusted to reflect all of these changes.

    The results from EIB-138 were used in three ERS Charts of Note dated March 23, 2015; July 15, 2015; and August 11, 2015; and an Amber Waves feature article “Most U.S. Households Do Their Main Grocery Shopping at Supermarkets and Supercenters Regardless of Income,” dated August 3, 2015. For all but the August 11, 2015, Chart of Note, changes in estimates were not numerically or substantively different. In the August 11, 2015, Chart of Note, the difference between WIC participants’ and nonparticipants’ choice of supercenters as their primary stores was no longer statistically significant.

  • Wheat: Background for 1995 Farm Legislation

    AER-712, April 03, 1995

    This report address considerations in the 1995 farm bill debate for wheat, including market conditions, policy proposals, trade agreements, and the interactions between policy and markets for selected commodities. Surplus wheat stocks disappeared under the Food, Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990. The aggregate U.S. wheat sector appears in balance due, in part, to acreage reduction programs, the Conservation Reserve Program, and the Export Enhancement Program. However, some industry participants wonder whether wheat carryover levels are optimal and whether the public will approve a continuation of government expenditures near current levels, while others want to maintain low carryover stocks. Exports will likely be the largest source of demand growth for U.S. wheat for the remainder of the 1990s. Global wheat trade is expected to expand steadily through the 1990s at a rate higher than the 1980s, but well below the rate experienced in the 1970s. The U.S. market share is expected to drop slightly over the next decade to about 31 percent as competition increases in a growing world market. Issues for the 1995 farm legislation include levels of program benefits and costs, methods for calculating deficiency payments, the future of the Conservation Reserve Program, farm program cost containment, planting flexibility, wheat imports, marketing loan provisions, targeting benefits to producers, environmental quality, and the future of the Export Enhancement Program.

  • Wheat: Background for 1990 Farm Legislation

    AGES-8956, October 02, 1989

    This report address considerations in the 1990 farm bill debate for wheat, including market conditions, policy proposals, trade agreements, and the interactions between policy and markets for selected commodities. Surplus wheat stocks declined under the 1985 Food Security Act as exports expanded due in part to the export enhancement program and reductions in the loan rate. Cutbacks in wheat production and recent droughts in key producing areas further reduced wheat stocks and increased prices. Although burdensome stocks could easily return, there is also the risk of shortage and high prices if additional production shortfalls and demand increases occur in the near future. Exports will likely be the main source of demand growth for U.S. wheat. However, world trade is not expected to match the sharp expansion of the 1970s and competition among the major exporters may intensify. Issues for 1990 farm legislation include loan rate and target price levels, the level of farm program costs, planting flexibility, and the future of the export enhancement program.

  • Wheat: Background and Issues for Farm Legislation

    WHS-0701-01, August 01, 2001

    Congress is considering new farm legislation to replace the expiring Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996. As background for these deliberations, this report provides information on supply, demand, and prices in the U.S. wheat sector and examines alternative policy choices.

  • Wheat Prices Driven By Supply and Demand, Not Speculators

    Amber Waves, June 02, 2014

    Supply and demand shocks specific to the wheat market were the dominant cause of price spikes between 1991 and 2011 in U.S. wheat futures markets.

  • Wheat Outlook: September 2017

    WHS-17i, September 14, 2017

    The September 2017 outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets is analyzed based on the latest projections contained in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: September 2016

    WHS-16I, September 14, 2016

    The September 2016 outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets is analyzed based on the latest projections contained in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: September 2015

    WHS-15I, September 15, 2015

    The September 2015 outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets is analyzed based on the latest projections contained in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: September 2014

    WHS-14I, September 15, 2014

    The September 2014 outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets is analyzed based on the latest projections contained in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Uses Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: September 2013

    WHS-13I, September 16, 2013

    The outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets are analyzed based on the latest projections contained in the World Agricultural Supply and Uses Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: September 2012

    WHS-12I, September 14, 2012

    The outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets are analyzed based on the latest projections contained in the World Agricultural Supply and Uses Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: October 2017

    WHS-17J, October 16, 2017

    The October 2017 outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets is analyzed based on the latest projections contained in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: October 2016

    WHS-16J, October 14, 2016

    The October 2016 outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets is analyzed based on the latest projections contained in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: October 2015

    WHS-15J, October 14, 2015

    The October 2015 outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets is analyzed based on the latest projections contained in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: October 2012

    WHS-12J, October 15, 2012

    The outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets are analyzed based on the latest projections contained in the World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: October 2014

    WHS-14J, October 15, 2014

    The October 2014 outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets is analyzed based on the latest projections contained in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Uses Estimates report.

  • Wheat Outlook: November 2017

    WHS-17K, November 14, 2017

    The November 2017 outlook for both the U.S. and global wheat markets is analyzed based on the latest projections contained in USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report.