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Food and Nutrition Assistance Research Database

Project: Food Demands and Nutrient Availability of Low-Income Households
Award Year: 2000
Amount of award, fiscal 2000: $10,000.00
Institution: University of Tennessee
Principal Investigator: Steven Yen
Status: Completed
Detailed Objective: This project estimates the effect of Food Stamp Program (FSP) benefits on households' food expenditures and nutrient availability using 1997-98 data from the National Food Stamp Program Survey (NFSPS). Studies that documented positive effects of food stamp benefits on food expenditure and nutrient availability have become dated.

The FSP provides needy households with purchasing power to buy food. With increased food expenditures, households that receive food stamps may improve their diets and diet-related health conditions. Numerous studies have documented a positive effect of food stamp benefits on food expenditure and nutrient availability. However, data analyzed in previous studies were collected prior to the abolishment of purchase requirement in FSP in 1979. The NFSPS, conducted for USDA in 1997-98, provides data to update the estimated effect of food stamp benefits on food expenditures and the availability of nutrients to needy households. The NFSPS data will be analyzed to estimate food demand elasticities for food stamp households. The research will address econometric problems associated with the large number of households reporting zero consumption. The effect of food stamp benefits on household nutrient availability will be estimated by linking the marginal propensity to consume food, food demand elasticities, and the nutrient profile of the foods consumed by food stamp households.

Topic: Dietary Intake and Quality, Food Prices and Demand, SNAP/Food Stamp Program
Dataset: National Food Stamp Program Survey (NFSPS)
Output:
Yen, S., and B. Lin. "Beverage Consumption Among U.S. Children and Adolescents: Full-Information and Quasi Maximum-Likelihood Estimation of a Censored System," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 29, Issue 1, March 2002.
Yen, S., B. Lin, and D. Smallwood. "Quasi- and Simulated-Likelihood Approaches to Censored Demand Systems: Food Consumption by Food Stamp Recipients in the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 85, No. 2, May 2003.
Yen, S., B. Lin, D. Smallwood, and M. Andrews. "Demand for Nonalcoholic Beverages: The Case of Low-Income Households," Agribusiness, Vol. 20, No. 3, Summer 2004.

Last updated: Thursday, July 05, 2012

For more information contact: Victor Oliveira

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